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News

By Christa Werle and Samantha Lopez

Public Libraries Magazine | Volume 56, No. 2

 

No matter the size of the library or the population it serves, all public libraries are working toward a common goal—providing relevant and impactful services in areas most important to patrons. As we strive to be a data-driven organization at Sno-Isle Libraries in Snohomish and Island Counties, WA, it is our job to make sure our programs are allocating the right amount of resources to our highest priority services and addressing the needs and interests of our communities. And we need the data to show it.

 

Data-Driven Change

Sno-Isle Libraries started its outcome data work in 2015 with project management. We began adopting project management methodologies including project charters, the role of project sponsor, and adherence to planning before execution. We considered how to evaluate quality control and user experience, and we were introduced to the outcomes-based logic model by Moe Hosseini-Ara and Rebecca Jones. Continuing to look at systems and processes that would keep our organization moving forward, we saw that we needed better support for our programming services through support and evaluation. Of course, all of this needed to happen without any additional resources (sound like a familiar problem?). We needed to learn how our patrons are benefiting from our programs and we needed to do so quickly, easily, and inexpensively. With the release of the Public Library Association’s (PLA) Project Outcome in June 2015, it’s as if the stars had perfectly aligned.

 

Sno-Isle Libraries started engagingwith Project Outcome in Fall 2015, as the work of the Programming Support and Evaluation Project began, and was invited by PLA to participate in the 2016 pilot-testing of the Project Outcome Follow-Up Surveys. For us, the power of using Project Outcome is in its consistency and standardization. It is our belief that libraries don’t need nine thousand different ways of doing evaluation. Again, we’re all working toward that common goal, so why keep reinventing the wheel? Project Outcome is a free service available to all US and Canadian public libraries. It provides standardized outcome measures in seven core library services areas, measuring four key outcomes: knowledge, confidence, application/behavior change, and awareness. As a result of articipating, Sno-Isle Libraries has shifted its programming purpose statements to align with Project Outcome’s seven core service areas and has fully adopted the key outcomes into our planning and surveying.

 

The Evaluation Plan

Knowing our evaluation plan and having clear, standardized outcome metrics (Project Outcome) helped us define our audit and evaluation objective deliverable: to produce a Quarterly State of Programming Report to our organization.

 

This was our first time attempting a report like this, so in Spring 2016 we took the opportunity to pilot-test the Project Outcome Follow-Up Surveys as a way to pilot-test our own evaluation process. Following the testing, we submerged fully into the audit with one-month snapshots in July and October. The auditing included collecting inputs, outputs, and the outcome-based surveys. We were able to gather enough big-picture data to understand the state of our programming services.

 

What we learned from the audit is that we need to level the playing field where resource availability is scarce or inconsistently applied. We also need to support staff with core curriculum in our strategic priorities and provide feedback to resource managers to allow progress in priority areas. This revealed the need for the State of Programming Report.

 

The complication, not surprisingly, is that multiple people are accountable for multiple services and programs and they’re all vying for the same resources to move their service plans forward. The audit showed that Sno-Isle Libraries invests approximately $1.13 million annually in programming services, including staff time and financial resources. We need to take this seriously and know exactly how those programs are contributing to our strategic plan.

 

We entered into a new strategic plan process for 2017–19 following the initial audit. Our new strategic plan is outcome-focused, including the core service: to present programs addressing community needs and interests. While all of these plans are in motion—strategic planning, writing outcome-based service plans, auditing and evaluating programs, and creating the State of Programming Reports—they all tie back together through the core Project Outcome measures.

 

Supporting the Strategic Plan

Sno-Isle Libraries practices a one-page strategic plan. Each core service and strategic priority of the plan has its own service plan, which includes:

  • How to identify the need/demand of the service?
  • Who is accountable?
  • What is the impact?
  • Who is the target audience? and,
  • How are we using outcomes to get where we want to be (over the three-year strategic plan period)?

 

The quarterly State of Programming Report summarizes the audit from several operational reports, such as average cost of staff time per programmer, per location, by programming service area, and Project Outcome metrics.

 

The operational reports reflect changes made to our programming purpose statements, which were adjusted in the 2016 audit to directly align with the Project Outcome areas of service. The past programming purpose statements were already similarly aligned to Project Outcome, so there was minimal resistance implementing this change. Now, our data can be compared across future strategic plans, and not be tied to specific strategic planning or “seasonal” periods. Measuring programming consistently across long periods of time, using consistent language and metrics, allows us to make data-driven decisions, track change over time, and better inform future strategic planning.

 

Another key area measured in the operational reports is the program purpose. Shifting our focus to quality control and the user experience means shifting the way we think about the programs themselves, not just how to evaluate them. We need our programmers to understand what the desired outcomes of the program are, and if the program isn’t aiming to impact our patrons’ lives, is it worth keeping? The operational report asks programmers, “Is the purpose of this program to improve customer skills or knowledge or change a specific behavior?” In the initial audit, a quarter of responses came back neutral or negative. This data should inform decisions about resource shifting or program elimination when the results show that a program is not designed to make a change for the customer.

 

Of course, we can’t forget about outcomes! Our operational reports provide our snapshot survey data demonstrating our impact in key outcome areas like knowledge, confidence, and behavior change. We conducted both Immediate and Follow-Up Surveys using the Project Outcome measures. Immediate Surveys work best for quick, snapshot assessments and are easily administered after a program is complete, while the Follow-Up Surveys capture more robust outcome data but require more resources and staff time to follow up with patrons.

 

As most libraries have experienced, convenience sampling and snapshot survey data often lead to overly-positive results, and Sno-Isle Libraries is no different. We aim to focus on the question “where are the opportunities?” in a sea of positive datasets and move the needle where patrons feel most neutral about our programs and are responding “neither agree nor disagree.” We’ve also been able to leverage the outcome surveys as an opportunity to cross-pollinate with other non-programming departments. Surveying allows us to collect additional data such as marketing channel reach to determine effectiveness of efforts, and audience demographics to help us become more intentional about determining the target audiences of our services.

 

Maintaining Momentum

The State of Programming Report and program auditing will continue to happen quarterly (January, April, July, October) and become business-as-usual for our organization. The outcome surveys will be available for programmers to administer at any time, but will only be required during the audit months. Ideally, we would like both the Immediate and Follow-Up Surveys to be used throughout the year, but until we allocate more resources, we will only follow up on Educational/Lifelong Learning and Digital Learning programs occurring during the audit months and on Economic Development programs throughout the year.

 

The more auditing we do and the more patron surveys we collect, the clearer the big picture will become and the better informed we’ll be for strategic, organizational decision making, like resource allocation and program expansion. While the pilot year of survey data is statistically significant for big picture assessment, weneed more data to represent the microlevels of our organization. By the end of our strategic plan (2019), we will have enough meaningful datasets to inform the same decisions by supervisors and managers at the community library level.

 

But that doesn’t mean we have to wait to start learning from our results and take action. Don’t take the immediate impact of the survey data for granted. Our programmers have reported how much they enjoy and find meaning in their patrons’ feedback and how quickly they can learn and make adjustments to their programs as a result. We’ve been able to make quick changes like speaking more loudly during instruction and more long-term changes like adding more robust and challenging digital literacy classes.

 

With any change comes some resistance. Some staff members were hesitant at first, but most have seen the benefits from having those immediate results right in from of them. The more they interact with the surveys, the more they want to use them (even during non-audit months). At the management level, we can show that each staff member’s time contributes to something larger than their own work. Our strategic plan is our atlas, the ongoing audit and evaluation provide the roadmap, and the survey feedback is building the roads to take our programming services where our customers need them to be.

 

Not only are staff members contributing to something larger than their own programs, but Sno-Isle Libraries is then able to contribute to something larger than itself. Participating in Project Outcome means our data is aggregated with hundreds of other libraries acrossthe United States and Canada. The aggregation of all participating data allows us to see how we compare state-wide and nationally in the seven library service areas. More importantly, it means libraries of various sizes and capacities, serving diverse populations and community needs, finally have a shared vocabulary and practice—through outcomes-based measurement.

 

Get full article.

Meaningful Measures | Assessment

By Jennifer Koerber on June 21, 2017
National initiatives step into the gap on the urgent need to capture outcomes

 

Measuring outcomes can be a vital aid to justifying library work to voters, funders, and stakeholders—as well as determining strategic direction—but it can also be overwhelming.

 

“Libraries are very good at counting outputs…it’s more difficult to count outcomes,” says Stacey Wedlake, research and communication coordinator for Impact Survey, one of several national projects developed over the past ten years to help public libraries jump that hurdle. “It takes a different way of thinking and approach to understand and then count how people were changed due to the access and use of your services.”

 

Some statewide efforts have had success with outcomes. New York and Oregon state libraries, for instance, offer outcomes-based evaluation (OBE) training and support for their members. The Job and Career Services Department of the Cuyahoga County Public Library, OH, has measured outcomes for decades, using paper and online surveys for participant evaluations and an electronic records system designed for counseling centers for secure data storage. However, many libraries don’t have staff with time to learn this approach, and, for the most part, only some of the most recent graduates have these skills.

 

Fortunately, efforts to provide that capacity on a national scale are rising to meet the need, but there is still plenty of room for growth—in adoption, in use of the data, and in taking outcomes-based assessment to the next level.

 

Read the full Library Journal article HERE

 
Wed, 04/05/2017
 
Laurence Deutsch
Manager, Communications
Public Library Association (PLA)
 
This April, the Public Library Association (PLA) will offer a free webinar to help libraries measure the success of their summer reading and learning programs. The webinar, Using Project Outcome to Measure & Build a Better Summer Library Program, will be held on April 27 at 1:00 p.m. Central Time. This online learning opportunity will leverage resources provided through Project Outcome, a free service from PLA which libraries can use to make program improvements, justify funding requests, and strengthen community partnerships.
 
Webinar participants will learn what other libraries have done to successfully gather outcome data about summer learning, and why standardized summer program outcomes are so important from the state library’s perspective. Webinar participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their own experiences as well. To register or for more information, click here.
 
If you would like to enroll in Project Outcome in advance of the webinar, please visit www.projectoutcome.org. Questions about the webinar may be directed to info@projectoutcome.org or 800-545-2433 ext. 5857.
 
The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders. For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

CLICK HERE to listen to the latest Public Libraries FYI podcast episode featuring Project Outcome!

Original ALA Press Release

Thu, 03/02/2017

 

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association (PLA)
312-280-5857
slopez@ala.org

 

CHICAGO – Money Smart week (April 22-29) is quickly approaching! Join the Public Library Association (PLA) to prepare for the financial literacy programs and events at your library! PLA is partnering with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy (OIEA) for a special webinar presentation, Money Smart, Measure Smarter: Boost Your Financial Literacy Programs & Measure Their Impact, to be held on March 16 at 1:00 p.m. Central. Registration is free but space is limited.

 

This free webinar will highlight how the SEC can help you plan for your financial literacy programs, including the free digital and print resources and tools available to librarians and patrons, so you can feel confident teaching your patrons about financial topics such as sound principles of saving and investing, how to spot and avoid investment fraud, and more! You’ll also learn how to invite the SEC to come present at your library.

 

Project Outcome will show how you can use Project Outcome Surveys to measure the impact of your financial literacy programs. Webinar participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their own experiences.

 

At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

  • Understand the role of the SEC and how it can help them with their own financial planning, as well as financial programming in their library;
  • Be able to identify and access key investment resources for themselves and their patrons; and
  • Know how Project Outcome can help easily and effectively measure the impact their financial literacy programs are having on patrons.

This webinar is open to everyone and will be helpful for anyone interested in financial and investment planning and resources. Project Outcome is a free service provided by the Public Library Association. If you would like to enroll in Project Outcome in advance of the webinar, please do so at www.projectoutcome.org. For more financial literacy resources, visit Money Smart Week, Smart Investing @ Your Library, and Investor.org

Original Press Release

Wed, 01/25/2017

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association (PLA)
312-280-5857
slopez@ala.org


CHICAGO – Join the Public Library Association (PLA) to learn how you can successfully roll out its latest outcome measurement initiative in your library. How to Successfully Roll Out Project Outcome in Your Library will be held on February 23 at 1:00 p.m. Central. Registration is free but space is limited.

 

Many libraries have heard about Project Outcome and are ready to get started. But what does it take to successfully implement Project Outcome in your library? This webinar will cover good practices for on-boarding staff, building internal support, and organizing your data collection team. Learn some of the steps libraries have taken early on to launch Project Outcome and spark support for outcome measurement, whether in a single library or an entire system. This webinar will feature two Project Outcome users who will share their success stories and lessons learned. All participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their own experiences.

 

At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

  • Be able to identify key steps in successfully implementing outcome measurement, as outlined in the Project Outcome road map;
  • Understand good practices and strategies for on-boarding staff, building internal support, and organizing their data collection team; and
  • Know how other libraries have successfully implemented Project Outcome and how to access additional resources for support, including the Project Outcome Community of Practice.

 

This webinar is free and open to everyone interested in outcome measurement. If you would like to enroll in Project Outcome in advance of the webinar, visit www.projectoutcome.org.  

 

Project Outcome is a FREE online toolkit offering an innovative and easy-to-use platform for public libraries to measure the impact of their programs and services. Staff are able to easily measure patron outcomes using the field-tested surveys, quickly analyze their data using ready-made reports and interactive data dashboards, and take action using the results. To learn more about Project Outcome, view the latest introductory webinar, Outcome Measurement Made Easy with PLA’s Project Outcome, or visit the 2016 Annual Report.

 

The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders. For more information about PLA, visit www.pla.org

Read the original article from Public Libraries Online

by Felton Thomas on November 28, 2016

 

Ideal student” and “a pleasure to teach” were the phrases often used to describe fourteen-year-old Kendra Monroe. A sophomore at Anywhere School of the Arts, Kendra had overcome great odds to attend the preeminent public high school for performance in her state. The oldest child of a single mother who worked two jobs, Kendra often had to surrender her dreams for the betterment of her younger brothers. While she was praised as one of the better dance students, additional ballet training after school for Kendra was not possible. Instead, she was tasked with picking up her siblings from their school and taking them to the public library until their mother got off work.

 

Despite the limitations she faced in her one true love (dance), Kendra blossomed academically. The public library had become the family’s second home and the resources at the library had become the foundation for her success. Eighteen months ago, Kendra had walked into the Main Branch not knowing what to expect from the library. She shushed her brothers as they walked in and was initially surprised at how much activity surrounded her. A library staff member welcomed them at the front desk and directed her to a room in the back. As they walked through the library, they passed banks of computers that were filled with focused users. When they reached the meeting room, she was greeted by a young woman who introduced herself as Kailey. Kailey was a local college student who worked with a library partner organization to provide tutoring every afternoon after the local schools ended their day.

 

Kendra was a good student before she started working with Kailey, but the math tutoring that she received at the library transformed her from a middle-of-the road math student to the highest-scoring pupil in her algebra class. It hadn’t been easy. At first, Kendra was resistant to spending every afternoon watching her brothers and breaking down math equations, but her mother was thrilled with the arrangement. Kendra would sometimes be embarrassed when her mom would praise her as “my little genius” to her friends, but she was glad that her mother was proud of her. She could see changes in her brothers as well: her youngest brother was now reading all the time and the middle child was now an honor roll student.

 

While she still missed taking additional ballet classes, her mom would let her stay a little longer at the library for its Wednesday yoga class. Her mother also let her volunteer on the weekends. She was surprised by how many interesting programs the library offered and how they affected the lives of so many people. Sometimes, the librarian would let her introduce an author or someone important, and Kendra would think about how the library had changed her. Eighteen months ago, she had walked into the library as a student of the Anywhere School of the Arts. The library now allowed her to become a student of the world.

 

Kendra’s story is fictional, but we know that public libraries are transforming lives like Kendra’s across the United States every day. As I mentioned in my last column, I’m the poster child for public libraries changing lives, but beyond anecdotal stories, what can we do to document our work?

 

PLA’s Project Outcome seeks to solve this shortfall of information and the results are promising. Project Outcome started in 2013 as a task force of librarians and researchers who were brought together to consider outcome measurement. Then-PLA President Carolyn Anthony made outcome measurement her most important initiative and a task force was launched to examine using standardized measurements to judge the effectiveness of library programs. Chaired by Denise Davis, deputy director, Sacramento Public Library, the task force began with a question: “How do we go beyond simple attendance counts and enhance existing service data?” The task force met for over a year and in the fall of 2014 began to test surveys in seven core service program areas:

  • Civic/Community Engagement
  • Digital Learning
  • Early Childhood Literacy
  • Economic Development
  • Education/Lifelong Learning
  • Job Skills
  • Summer Reading

 

Each survey is flexible, easy to use, and accessible to libraries of all sizes. The feedback from the pilot libraries that tested the surveys were positive and patrons liked that the surveys were short and specific. The success of the pilot led to funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. A three-year, three-million-dollar grant has allowed PLA to expand the program and currently 1,396 libraries are using Project Outcome. We are thrilled by this promising beginning, but recognize that we need many more participants to join us so libraries can build more persuasive arguments about the programs we provide.

 

I know that you are shaping the lives of young people like Kendra every day with the programs libraries are providing, but we must move beyond expressing our successes through inputs. Success today is judged by the outcomes displayed by those who attend our programs. Please join us as we seek to document how we make our communities better. Get more information at www.projectoutcome.org or email info@projectoutcome.org.

Tue, 12/13/2016
 

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association (PLA)
312-280-5857
slopez@ala.org

 


CHICAGO – The Public Library Association (PLA) will be introducing libraries to its latest field-driven initiative, Project Outcome, through a free webinar, Outcome Measurement Made Easy with PLA’s Project Outcome, on January 12, 2017, at 1:00 p.m. Central. Project Outcome is a FREE online toolkit offering an innovative and easy-to-use platform for public libraries to measure the impact of their programs and services. Staff are able to easily measure patron outcomes using the field-tested surveys, quickly analyze their data using ready-made reports and interactive data dashboards, and take action using the results.

 

For the first time, public libraries have access to an aggregated set of outcome measurement data and analysis tools they can use to affect change within their communities and beyond. Since launching in June 2015, Project Outcome has over 1,000 libraries registered and has already helped hundreds of libraries make programmatic improvements, streamline strategic planning and decision making, increase advocacy, and gain funding. To learn more about Project Outcome’s successful first year, visit the interactive Annual Report.

 

Many libraries are still unaware of the free tools and resources available to them through Project Outcome. This introductory webinar will provide an overview of the toolkit and examples of how libraries have been able to benefit from using Project Outcome. At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

  • Understand how measuring outcomes can help demonstrate community impact;
  • Know what is included in the Project Outcome toolkit and how participating libraries are using it; and
  • Be able to apply the toolkit in their library.

 

This webinar is open to everyone interested in outcome measurement. Libraries can enroll in Project Outcome for free in advance of the webinar at www.projectoutcome.org.

 

The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders. For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

Mon, 10/31/2016

 

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association (PLA)
312-280-5857
slopez@ala.org


 
CHICAGO – The Public Library Association (PLA) has launched the first Project Outcome Annual Report. Access the 2016 Annual Report to analyze survey results, learn what patrons benefited from most, and see what Project Outcome and participating libraries did in the first year to make Project Outcome a success.
 
PLA’s Project Outcome is a FREE toolkit designed to help public libraries understand and share the true impact of essential library services and programs by providing simple surveys and an easy-to-use process for measuring and analyzing outcomes. Project Outcome also provides libraries with the resources and training support needed to apply their results and confidently advocate for their library’s future, helping them turn better data into better libraries. To learn more about Project Outcome and to register for free, visit www.projectoutcome.org.
 
Since launching in June 2015, Project Outcome has had over 2,000 participants representing over 1,000 public libraries across the U.S. and Canada register to be a part of this initiative. The Project Outcome system has aggregated over 40,000 patron surveys and is just getting started. 
 
Through Project Outcome, the library field is learning more than ever about the benefits that library patrons see in their own lives. Data collected from the first year of Project Outcome tell us unequivocally that library programs and services improve the lives of their patrons. People come to the library not just for books, but for programs that will help them learn a new skill or make a specific change in their lives. Within the first year, Project Outcome aggregated over 17,000 patron surveys. Nearly 80% of those library users surveyed report that library programs and services have had some kind of positive impact on their lives in the last year.
 
In addition, PLA learned that what patrons like most about the programs they’re attending is the educational aspect – from doing a new activity, to learning a new skill, to the librarian or instructor’s style of teaching. And these patron benefits are in high demand. Across every program type, the most common suggestion for improvement was to offer new, more frequent, or more current classes and programs. 
 
Project Outcome is just getting started. Like the hundreds of libraries that now have outcomes data to guide their strategy and support their advocacy, PLA is taking what they have learned to increase the impact of outcome measurement on libraries and communities everywhere. Project Outcome will continue to develop new and improved tools and resources to help libraries move from planning and implementing surveys to taking action using the results. Project Outcome will continue to work with libraries to build momentum and sustainability. From offering regional training and one-on-one library assistance, to building data-sharing partnerships, to expanding its work with state library staff and other types of libraries, Project Outcome will keep looking for opportunities to improve. 
 
The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders. For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

By Amanda Armstrong, Business Librarian, Loveland Public Librar, CO / 18 October 2016

Web Junction Original Article 

 

Serving as the Business Librarian for Loveland Public Library is extremely rewarding. My clients are typically entrepreneurs or new business owners, so they wear many hats and face new issues on a weekly basis. To understand these challenges, I meet with the client, learn about their endeavor, and discuss what information might help them start or grow their business. Then, I provide customized research and training on the library's business databases.

 

Business clients are grateful for the help and amazed by the information that is available on library databases and reliable internet sites. It's great work, and I believe it helps contribute to the strong local economy of thriving small businesses and artists in Loveland and the surrounding area. At the same time, gratefulness is hard to measure and quantify, so I find myself with more clients every year but a constant number of hours in which to do the work.

 

By late March 2016, it was clear that I would see a major increase in business clients for 2016 and it would stretch my resources even further. During that same time, my manager, Amy Phillips, attended the Public Libraries Association 2016 Conference in Denver, and she attended the Project Outcome Enrollment Workshop. After that half day session, she knew there was a way to quantify the impact of our business services and more.

 

Project Outcome is a survey and data analytics tool kit that allows public libraries to measure the impact of a program or service and the degree to which it may change their behavior. The surveys were developed and standardized by experts, so that the entire public library community can collect and compare their data to benchmarks. There's a variety of different standardized surveys on topics ranging from early childhood literacy to digital learning.

 

My manager and I reviewed all of the available surveys on the Project Outcome website and agreed that the economic development survey was the best fit. The website has a page where you can see each survey and the questions, so this was a relatively painless process. Next, we had to decide who would receive the survey and how to distribute it. Luckily, I use a spreadsheet to track my business client research requests and it includes each client's name, e-mail address, information requested, date completed and much more information. Using my spreadsheet, I was able to identify all of the business clients that I had worked with for the past seven months.

 

The Project Outcome training she attended and the webinar I reviewed made it clear that people needed to know their responses would be anonymous, so I developed an e-mail template that stated their data would be completely anonymous and provided my manager's contact information for questions. I used a mail merge to personalize the e-mail with the client's name, and the survey was available online via a hyperlink. Knowing that people are more likely to act if there is a deadline, we requested a response within five days, and then noted that the survey will typically take fewer than five minutes to complete.

 

Within a week and a half, 37% of the respondents had completed the survey and provided many useful, insightful comments. On top of that, Project Outcome provided a wonderful report summarizing the results of the survey and providing lots of great information; it's a template but one would barely know from looking at it. Our results included:

  • 80% of business clients felt more knowledgeable about what it takes to establish a business
  • 90% felt more confident about establishing a business
  • 95% intended to apply what they just learned
  • 85% were more aware of applicable resources

 

Additionally, there was a data portal that showed the results from the individual survey and benchmarked it against the Colorado state and national averages. I was also able to download an Excel file with the complete survey results and comments, which I used to perform additional analysis and review the comments as they related to the scoring on the standardized questions. Overall, my manager and I were both very pleased with the information available, as it provides a great combo of pretty, easily interpreted information to share with stakeholders and data to analyze further.

 

I reviewed the surveys and especially the comments to see if there was any feedback that would help me to improve my services. Also, after becoming familiar with the survey questions, I realized that it would likely be helpful to many business clients if I put more emphasis on the resources and databases that are available from the library. Now during my consultation sessions, I always include an introductory portion where I talk about the resources and services available from the library and any other free resources that may be useful for their particular type of business.

 

My manager took the reports and a sample of the comments to a Library Board Meeting and several other meetings. Having the data at hand to reference and the ability to share the reports with the Library Director, City Manager and other stakeholders gave her an edge during the budget development meetings.

 

Since then, I sent out the surveys to the majority of business clients served between May and August. The response rate to these requests was extremely low (less than 5%), so I plan to send another bulk request later this year to the business clients I've worked with since June.

 

In the meantime, I'm working through additional business requests and meeting new clients with the knowledge that these services truly make an impact on their businesses and confidence.

 

I strongly recommend using Project Outcome to measure the outcomes for both business programs and services, because it provides another tool for measuring the efficacy of our work. I think this is particularly important in the area of custom business research, because, unlike a program, it's hard to see the person's reaction and gauge if the data you provided helped them move forward.

Every so often a new phrase, buzzword, or philosophy about library service comes along and throws a different light on what we do, and how we do it. There’s been a lot of talk and interest in “the purpose-based library” recently. What’s that all about?

 

I had an opportunity to speak with Steven Potter, library director and CEO of the Mid-Continent Public Library in Kansas City, Missouri who recently co-authored a book on the subject. The purpose-based library connects with the community, collaborates to better reach goals, measures what is useful and shows value, and continually improves. Summing up, Potter says, “It is all about re-embracing the vitality of our profession.”

 

Sound familiar?  Over the past few years, there have been several campaigns, reports, and training opportunities on similar thoughts, some through our own professional organizations, and some through other arenas. Libraries have a plethora of tools at their disposal right now – all of which speak to the need to be more community centered and valuable. If you are looking to transform your library, measure outcomes, be the center of your city, or be more purpose-based, the following organizational programs are some great ways to get started.

 

The Libraries Transform campaign, an initiative of the American Library Association under the leadership of then-President Sari Feldman, was designed to increase public awareness of the value, impact, and services provided by libraries and library professionals. The highly graphical Libraries Transform campaign provides great ready-made pieces libraries can use to showcase the transformative nature of today’s libraries and elevate the critical role libraries play in the digital age.  This is an easy way to get clear, colorful graphics that you can use in your building, on your website, or in your print items right out of the box.

 

Project Outcome is the Public Library Association’s latest field-tested outcome measurement initiative. “The goal of Project Outcome is to help public libraries understand and share the true impact of essential library services and programs. While many public libraries collect data about their services and programs, what is often lacking are the data to support what good they are providing their communities, such as programs serving childhood literacy, digital and technological training, and workforce development. With Project Outcome, patron attendance and anecdotal success stories are no longer the only way libraries can demonstrate their effectiveness. Developed by library leaders, researchers, and data analysts, Project Outcome is designed to give libraries simple tools and supportive resources to help turn better data into better libraries.  To start measuring the true impact of your public library, join Project Outcome today!”

 

The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation is not a library organization, but libraries are finding that the premise of the institute, a desire to “turn outward” to your community, dovetails beautifully with the movement to be seen as more relevant to their communities.  Turning outward means using the community, not your conference room, as the main reference point for decisions – from the strategies you and your partners pursue, the partners you choose, how you start and then grow your efforts over time, and even how you structure and run your internal organization.  The Midwest Collaborative for Library Services (MCLS), along with the Library of Michigan, believes greatly in turning outward and becoming more relevant and valued in the eyes of the community.  They have embarked on a collaborative project to train a cohort of Michigan librarians in the Harwood method – offering scholarships, training, and coaching calls in order to assist their member libraries in becoming more outward looking and purpose-based.

 

Seeing so many similar ideas grow organically out of our field during a rather short span of time,  make it clear that the library field as a whole is feeling the need to reshape how we tell our story, and how to best show the value in what public libraries do.  If we don’t tell our story well, who will?

 

Original article by Trish Burns on October 14, 2016, Public Libraries Online

Wed, 08/10/2016

 

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association (PLA)
3122805027
slopez@ala.org

 

CHICAGO – In an effort to better support library’s assessment needs, the Public Library Association’s (PLA) Project Outcome has partnered with the Urban Libraries Council’s (ULC) Edge Initiative and the University of Washington’s Impact Survey to host a webinar, Measurement Matters: Using Edge, Project Outcome, and the Impact Survey to Assess and Improve Community Outcomes, on September 8, 2016, 1:00 – 2:00 PM Central. This webinar is free and will demonstrate how all three tools can help libraries implement a comprehensive assessment strategy to better their data and share their community impact.

 

The three field-driven tools help support libraries with various assessment needs:

  • Edge, an online assessment that helps library leaders align library technology services to the needs of the community and communicate the library’s value to community leaders.
  • Project Outcome, a series of outcome-focused surveys about library programs, along with training, a portal for administering surveys, and an online data dashboard. 
  • Impact Survey, an online tool to help libraries better understand their communities and how people use their public technology resources and services.

 

Knowledge is power. Collectively, the Edge Initiative, Project Outcome, and Impact Survey are powerful, field-tested instruments being used by libraries throughout the United States to make strategic decisions on which programming and services to offer and which technology investments should be made to ensure that the library continues to meet patron needs and community priorities.

 

This free webinar will educate libraries on these three measurement tools and showcase how libraries are using the data for strategic planning, programming, and communication with local leaders to better serve their communities. Participants will hear from staff at PLA, ULC, the University of Washington iSchool and public libraries using all three products.

 

Webinar registration is open to everyone but will be most beneficial to those interested in strengthening their programs and services through library vetted tools. All public libraries participating in Edge, Project Outcome, and Impact Survey are also invited to attend to learn how the tools work together and complement each other.

 

The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders. For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

 

Illinois Library Association

 

June 2016 | Volume XXXIV. Issue 3

 

June 8, 2016

 

Carolyn Anthony, Skokie Public Library

 

A young woman who had recently graduated from college came to see me as part of her exploration of possible career directions. “I feel like in public libraries I could really make a difference in people’s lives,” she said. I told her I agreed, but had to acknowledge that as of yet we have little data to confirm the hypothesis that public libraries do, in fact, change lives. In a recent study from the Pew Research Center, it was reported that two-thirds of Americans (65 percent) ages 16 and older say that closing their local public library would have a major impact on their community. In an earlier study, the Pew Research Center reported that 90 percent of Americans ages 16 and older say that the closing of their local public library would have an impact on their community.

 

If closing the public library would have an impact on the local community, does it follow that the library also makes an impact by being open? We have a lot of anecdotes about transformative experiences at the public library, but no real data to back that up. Do the stories represent occasional, exceptional outcomes of library use or are they part of a pattern that in fact points to broad community impact?

 

For years now, public libraries have largely reported output measures of activity such as circulation, reference questions answered, door count, and program attendance. These measures show that the library has put resources to use, and the measures may be compared over time within a library to show a trend in library use or compared among libraries of similar size and funding level to get an idea of the potential for growth in services. The output measures, however, do not begin to answer the question, “What difference did the public library make to the individual?” or the larger question, “What is the impact of the public library on the community?”

 

Moreover, in recent years, many of the output measures traditionally reported by the public library have started to decline. We understand that public libraries are fielding fewer reference questions because so many people are using Google to find answers to their questions. They may be reading some of their books and magazines digitally and renewing titles online rather than making a trip to the library to have staff update their circulation record. For these reasons and more that we are aware of and can explain, library outputs are generally static or declining. Funding authorities may look at these figures and conclude that the local public library needs less revenue for operations or that there is no need to expand or upgrade a dated library facility. 

 

Those of us working in public libraries know that we are not doing less. In fact, public libraries have been busier than ever and doing important work such as helping job seekers prepare resumes or look for work during the recent downturn in the economy; working with parents and preschoolers on early childhood literacy skills; teaching people computer skills; and bringing people together for discussion of societal issues such as immigration or prison reform. Unfortunately, we have not done a very good job of capturing the results of these efforts. The number of people served has been collected via hash marks and reported in a larger figure of library program attendance or door count that tells nothing about the difference the service made to the individual or collectively to the community.

 

Continue Reading Full Article

Immediate Release

Contact:

 

CHICAGO – Join the Public Library Association (PLA) for the launch of the newest set of performance measures during Project Outcome’s preconference workshop, Friday, June 24, at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando. PLA will convene public library representatives and introduce them to Project Outcome and how it helps libraries measure the impact of their services.

Library leaders from PLA’s Performance Measurement Task Force will kick off the session by describing their experience testing the outcome measures in seven core service areas. Attendees will learn how to deploy outcome measures in their libraries, collect and use resulting data, and leverage the project’s support network to ensure successful adoption.

The training provided in this preconference will be expanded to include the newest set of performance measures developed and tested by the Task Force. Project Outcome’s current measures capture patrons’ immediate perceptions of value gained from a program or service. The new follow-up measures aim to capture patron-reported changes made after a period of time has passed.

The Task Force knew libraries wanted more advanced measures to better capture their community impact and have been hard at work developing the additional measures since launching Project Outcome last June. The follow-up measures provide a second opportunity for the library to collect data on the effectiveness of its programs. For example, a patron may initially report feeling confident about the new job-search skills they learned at a library program, but did they actually use them? Did they receive an interview or job offer? Now libraries will be able to discover whether or not patron change was made and better support their impact story.

By registering for this preconference workshop, libraries agree to participate in Project Outcome by implementing its surveys and accessing online tools and resources. Individuals and public libraries interested in participating in Project Outcome or learning more about outcome measurement can register for free at www.projectoutcome.org.

Generous funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has allowed PLA to accelerate and expand Project Outcome’s development and implementation. PLA and the Performance Measurement Task Force continue to build more advanced outcome measures and improve upon the online tools for users to continue turning better data into better libraries.

The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders.

For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

For Immediate Release

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
PLA
3122805857
slopez@ala.org


CHICAGO – Project Outcome has aggregated approximately 11,000 patron surveys within its online system. This milestone comes before the one-year anniversary of Project Outcome’s official launch on June 26, 2015. Project Outcome will continue providing even more ways for libraries to collect patron outcomes by launching its new follow-up surveys during a preconference workshop, June 24, 2016, at ALA Annual in Orlando.

Project Outcome is a free, online service managed by the Public Library Association (PLA) and is dedicated to helping public libraries understand and share the true impact of essential library services and programs. Project Outcome’s patron surveys were designed and developed by the PLA Performance Measurement Task Force comprised of library leaders, researchers and data analysts. The Task Force identified seven library service areas for Project Outcome’s surveys to assess that could be easily and directly linked to improving or changing a patron’s knowledge, behavior, skills, application and awareness:

  • Civic/Community Engagement
  • Early Childhood Literacy
  • Economic Development
  • Education/Lifelong Learning
  • Job Skills
  • Summer Reading


To date, nearly 1,600 participants across all 50 states and parts of Canada have registered for Project Outcome. Over 450 public libraries are currently using the Project Outcome surveys and data analysis tools to measure the outcomes of at least one program or service within their library. Participating libraries have reported being able to use their survey results to make program improvements, change the conversation with their board, and strengthen their partnership action plans and grant funding proposals.

Individuals and public libraries interested in participating in Project Outcome or learning more about outcome measurement can register for free at www.projectoutcome.org.

Generous funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has allowed PLA to accelerate and expand Project Outcome’s development and implementation. PLA and the Performance Measurement Task Force continue to build more advanced outcome measures and improve upon the online tools for users to continue turning better data into better libraries.

The Public Library Association (PLA) is the largest association dedicated to supporting the unique and evolving needs of public library professionals. Founded in 1944, PLA serves nearly 9,000 members in public libraries large and small in communities across the United States and Canada, with a growing presence around the world. PLA strives to help its members shape the essential institution of public libraries by serving as an indispensable ally for public library leaders.

For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

By Emily Schaber

When it comes to our collections, great public librarians are like great Instructional Designers: We keep them current, relevant, appealing, and responsive to our communities. Keeping our collections useful and looking good means we have to get rid of things though. That’s right: Public libraries throw books away. Here is how to reduce scrap learning in your training.


Scrap's Customer Component

In Learning and Development, our customers are our learners and the businesses whose outcomes our training has to optimize. As business needs change, Instructional Designers must adapt their content, methods, and objectives, in response.

I may be biased, but I don’t know who understands changes in customer needs better than librarians do. Google has not replaced us though, and here’s why: We are working hard all the time to keep up with and, ideally, stay ahead of our customers’ needs.

How, you ask? You can bet we’ve got a nice, neat, organized system for that too. Project Outcome, for example, is a research and data-informed initiative of the Public Library Association that guides public libraries across the country in using patron surveys to measure and analyze results from their programs and services in Civic/Community Engagement, Digital Inclusion, Early Childhood Literacy, Economic Development, Education/Lifelong Learning, Job Skills, and Summer Reading.

We are methodical and purposeful and, boy, do we like things orderly. If you’ve heard the rumors though that librarians are out and about town, asking their customers how they can best support them, the rumors are true. We have common goals with you, Instructional Designers and eLearning professionals. Come on in and meet us. Or, better yet, find us embedded in your community.

A caveat: Hands off those banned books though. If you think we’re weeding out Slaughterhouse-Five, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, or And Tango Makes Three, umm, no.

CLICK HERE to read the full eLearning Industry article.

Looking Back

What started from the work of the Performance Measurement Task Force (PMTF), established during my 2013 Public Library Association (PLA) presidency, has now become a full-fledged PLA service known as Project Outcome, providing over 900 registered users with the outcome measurement tools, resources and support needed to measure the true impact of their library services and programs. Over 200 public libraries are currently using the Project Outcome survey tools to measure the outcomes of at least one program or service and nearly 5,000 surveys have been aggregated into the Project Outcome Data Dashboards. In just six short months after launching in June, Project Outcome has quickly met the public library demand and desire for standardized performance measures and continues to expand toward more advanced data collection. 


My 2014 Public Libraries Online article Moving Toward Outcomes highlights the importance of understanding why outcome measurement is essential to enhancing the ever-changing roles of libraries. Looking back on this year of introducing outcome measurement to a vast range of public library audiences, it is clear that the shift toward making outcome measurement standard practice is in full swing. Working on the planning development of Project Outcome at the 2015 American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Chicago, we established the project’s goals, what the tools would look like, and how users would be supported so they could easily implement outcome measurement within their own libraries. Almost a year later, the Task Force is already working on the next set of advanced measures. PLA has presented Project Outcome at six different conferences, while simultaneously conducting 9 webinars to nearly 1,000 attendees on various outcome measurement topics and will continue to expand its reach throughout 2016.

 

To read the full article, visit Public Libraries Online

For Immediate Release
Thu, 12/03/2015

Contact:

Samantha Lopez
Project Coordinator
Public Library Association
312-280-5857
slopez@ala.org

CHICAGO – Since launching on June 26, the Public Library Association’s (PLA) Project Outcome has quickly met public library demand and desire for standardized performance measures by exceeding 200 library users in just six short months.  

Project Outcome is dedicated to helping public libraries understand and share the true impact of essential library services and programs with simple survey instruments and an easy-to-use process for measuring and analyzing outcomes. The surveys were designed and developed by the Performance Measurement Task Force comprised of library leaders, researchers, and data analysts. Project Outcome’s surveys, resources, training, and supportive online community provide public libraries with everything they need to apply their results and confidently advocate for their library's future.

To date, nearly 750 Project Outcome participants – ranging from U.S. and Canadian public library, state, researchers and other non-public library users – have registered for free online. Over 200 public libraries are currently using the Project Outcome survey tools and measuring the outcomes of at least one program or service within their library. 

For the first time, public libraries, whether new to outcome measurement or advanced in data collection, have free access to an aggregated set of performance measurement data and analysis tools they can use to affect change  within their communities and beyond. Over 4,000 surveys have been collected and aggregated within the Project Outcome Data Dashboards and library participants have already reported using their results to take action – from including results in board presentations to making programmatic changes to justifying funding requests.

Libraries are able to use outcome data to affect change both internally and externally. One Project Outcome user combined the available Project Outcome reports and Data Dashboard visualizations to present the outcome results to his library administration – “I used the survey summary report and the Data Dashboard printouts and both were popular among staff. The report on detailed responses was also very popular. Everyone really liked seeing the comparison of how our surveys are doing compared to the national and state averages. Reports like this, showing the comparisons, are really useful and will definitely be included in our next Library Board presentation.”

Individuals and public libraries interested in participating in Project Outcome may register for free at www.projectoutcome.org

Generous funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has allowed PLA to accelerate and expand Project Outcome’s development and implementation. The Performance Measurement Task Force continues to build more advanced outcome measures for users to continue turning better data into better libraries. 

The Public Library Association (PLA) is a division of the American Library Association. PLA’s core purpose is to strengthen public libraries and their contribution to the communities they serve. Its mission is to enhance the development and effectiveness of public library staff and public library services. For more information about PLA, contact the PLA office at 1 (800) 545-2433, ext.5PLA, or pla@ala.org.

 

On October 29 American Library Association (ALA) president Sari Feldman launched the Libraries Transform campaign, a three-year national public awareness initiative focusing on the ways public, academic, school, and special libraries and librarians across the nation transform their communities. Events kicked off in Washington, DC, as the Libraries Transform team visited a cross-section of transformative libraries, and will continue with contributions from libraries—and library lovers—everywhere.

A NATIONAL CONVERSATION

The festivities were not limited to Washington, however. Libraries across the country are displaying large “Libraries Transform” banners, from the San Francisco Public Library to Oregon’s Multnomah County Library to Boston Public Library’s flagship Copley Square library, as well as academic libraries like those at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, and the University of Maryland in College Park.

Libraries large and small are encouraged to help spread the word through the Libraries Transform Toolkit. Users can download a Libraries Transform website banner, print a variety of posters and postcards with the campaign’s conversation-starting “Because…” messages (“Because more than a quarter of U.S. households don’t have a computer with an Internet connection”; “Because the world is at their fingertips and the world can be a scary place”; “Because students can’t afford scholarly journals on a ramen noodle budget”; and more), access articles and TEDx videos highlighting some of the innovative work going on. Supporters can also check out the list of Top Ten ways to engage with the campaign, including creating pop-up events and guerrilla marketing events. Users can also bring their own library stories to the site.

“What we would love for libraries across the country to do,” explained Rich, “is invite their customers to tell their stories of library transformation…and share the stories of some of the unique or innovative things that the library itself is doing to make a difference to drive both individual opportunity and community progress.” Libraries and customers alike are encouraged to take the conversation to social media as well—Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest—with the hashtag #LibrariesTransform.

“I want to stop the question ‘does anyone even use libraries anymore?’” Feldman told LJ. “We know libraries of all types are doing this work, in communities, on campuses, and in schools…. What we need to do is amplify the message and make sure that all Americans know what’s happening and what’s available in our libraries.”

Feldman added, “For me, there can be nothing more important than being sure that the general public—stakeholders, policymakers, funders—are all aware of this transformation, and the kind of individual opportunity and community progress that libraries are making.”

CLICK HERE to read the full Library Journal article.

Visit www.librariestransform.org to get involved!

 

Children who read, succeed

In that spirit, the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) have entered into a strategic partnership to help ensure student success.

As partners in education, the Library and CMS recognize that libraries are an indispensable asset to students and can serve as an extension of the classroom all year long.

2014-15 initiatives

Library cards for young students. At the start of the 2014-15 academic year, the Library worked with CMS to supply pre-K through 3rd graders with public library cards. The effort was funded in part by Foundation For The Carolinas. 17,494 students signed up for a new library card and more than 10,000 students with existing cards were given fine waivers to ensure their continued ability to borrow library materials. Students were also provided with information on how to use their library card to support their education.

Read more in these press releases:

Library eCard project. The second initiative, which began later in the 2014-15 school year, was a limited “Library e-card” initiative for students in grades 6-12 in the Project L.I.F.T community. This electronic library card gave more than 4,000 students and their teachers 24/7 access to all of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s electronic resources, including eBooks, eMagazines, music, and videos available from the Library’s web site www.cmlibrary.org. As part of the e-card initiative, Library staff visited the Project Lift schools to provide tutorials on library resources for CMS staff and students. This initiative helped provide valuable information on future efforts to provide all CMS students with library access via their student IDs.

CLICK HERE to learn more! 

Learn more about how outcomes reflect impact by reading the recent Library Journal article "Outcomes, Impacts, and Indicators" written by Project Outcome's Impact Survey partner, Samantha Becker. This article highlights the benefits and use of the Impact Survey, which will soon be available to Project Outcome users.  

Theory of Change

In an effort to learn how to best support Oregon’s public libraries as they address the challenges of serving a diverse public, the Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) commissioned a needs assessment on behalf of the Lora L. & Martin N. Kelley Family Foundation Trust and the Betsy Priddy Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation.

Read the Summary Report to learn how Project Outcome's measurement categories helped influence the study's eight roles to explore the diverse ways public libraries are engaged in supporting their communities. 

  • Arts, Culture and Creativity
  • Civic and Community Engagement
  • Digital Inclusion
  • Early Childhood Learning
  • Economic and Workforce Development
  • Education and Lifelong Learning
  • Encouraging Reading
  • Supporting Limited English-Speaking Communities

In the early stages of Project Outcome, the Direct of Skokie Public Library and Performance Measurement Task Force Leader, Carolyn Anthony, wrote an article about why outcome measurement is so important for the future of libraries. In this Public Libraries Online article, Anthony reminds readers that we must show more effectively that libraries are not only busy and efficiently run institutions, but that public libraries have multiple direct and indirect impacts on our communities. 

 

Click here to read the full article and other links to early Project Outcome initiatives. 

Deputy Director of Skokie Public Library, Richard Kong, wrote a guest blog post for the Young Adult Library Services Association, in which Kong discusses the use of evidence-based outcome measurement as a means of developing meaningful programs for young people and Skokie Public Library's pilot testing of Project Outcome surveys. 

Click here to read the full article and link to other Young Adult Library Services news and events. 

The Public Library Association’s online magazine, Public Libraries Online, published a blog post written by Performance Measurement Task Force Member, Rebecca Teasdale. In this compelling article, Teasdale writes about her research involvement with the Task Force and the development process that created the Project Outcome surveys.

 

Click here to read the full article and link to other Public Library news and events.